Curriculum - English Language & Literature and English Education (B.A.)

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Jen Pento '09

Students in SNHU’s English education and English language and literature double major complete requirements for teacher certification with only nine more credits than required for a single major.

We pair classroom knowledge and theory with significant field experience, including student teaching in your senior year. Here you will examine traditional, innovative and research-based approaches to teaching. Our graduates are prepared professionals with the passion and skills to make a difference in today’s secondary schools.

Student Teaching
The program leads to teacher certification and culminates in a 16-week student teaching experience, where you will work full-time with an established teacher. Students apply for student teaching a year in advance and must complete all course requirements, including passing the PRAXIS II exam, before student teaching begins.

Required Core Courses

General Education Program

School of Arts and Sciences Required Courses

FAS-201: Introduction to Humanities I
This course offers vocabulary, understanding and appreciation of the visual arts in their cultural contexts in history, religion, literature, music and ideas. It focuses on the achievements of ancient Greece and Rome, the medieval period and the Renaissance while also exploring related issues in non-European cultures. May be taken independently of FAS-202.
FAS-202: Introduction to Humanities II
This course offers vocabulary, understanding and appreciation of the visual arts in their cultural contexts in history, religion, literature, music and ideas. It focuses on the cultural periods of the Baroque, the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Early Modernism while also exploring related issues in non-European cultures. May be taken independently of FAS-201.

Select One of the Following:

HIS ELE - Select one 100-level History elective
HIS ELE - Select one 200-level History elective

Select One of the Following:

HIS-113: United States History I: 1607-1865
The first half of the United States history survey courses covers the period from the founding of Jamestown to the end of the Civil War. The development of regionalism and its effect on the coming of the Civil War provides the framework for the investigation. Required for majors in history and social studies education with a concentration in history.
HIS-114: United States History II: 1865-Present
The second half of the United States history survey course covers the period following the Civil War. The economic, political and ideological developments that allowed the United States to attain a position of the world leadership are closely examined. Required for majors in History and Social Studies Education with a concentration in History.

English Major Courses

ENG-350: The English Language
This course is an introduction to the following topics in English linguistics: history of English, etymology, vocabulary (morphology), phonology, dictionaries, syntax, semantics, dialects, discourse analysis, and child language acquisition. The course is designed for students who want to learn about the English language as preparation for teaching, or for becoming better writers, or for studying literature. Students will have the opportunity to research, write about, and present on a linguistic topic of individual interest such as the language of advertising or propaganda.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or 120H and junior standing or instructor permission
LIT-201: World Literature I: Foundations of Culture
This course explores both early European (classical and medieval) cultures as well as the great non-European cultures of Asia, Africa and the Americas. The material covered will vary, but readings will focus on a major theme such as the hero, the role of women, ethical values, views of nature or focus on an important common genre, such as epic or lyric poetry. Not available every semester. Global marker.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
LIT-300: Literary Theory
This course is an introduction to the major schools of contemporary critical theory, and an examination of principal exponents of these theories. The student will become familiar with the most important features of psychoanalytic criticism, Marxism and feminism and examine the meaning of structuralism and post-structuralism. In addition, the course affords an opportunity to practice applying the theories to specific literary texts. Not available every semester.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or 120H and junior standing or instructor permission
LIT-319: Shakespeare
Students in LIT 319 study selected Shakespearian comedies, tragedies and chronicle plays. The course also provides the students with a general overview of the Elizabethan era and the world in which Shakespeare lived and worked. Not available every semester.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H

Select One of the Following:

LIT-450: Seminar in American Literature
This course uses a thematic approach to explore works by American writers. The specific selections and authors vary each term according to the theme. This is an upper-level course involving close reading, analysis and writing in seminar format. Not available every semester. Writing Intensive Course.
Prerequisites:
ENG-200 and one literature course or permission of instructor
LIT-451: Seminar in British Literature
This course uses a thematic approach to explore works of British writers. The specific selections and authors vary each term according to the theme. This is an upper-level course involving close reading, analysis and writing in seminar format. Not available every semester.
Prerequisites:
ENG-200 and one literature course or permission of instructor
LIT-452: Seminar in Global Literature
This course uses a thematic approach to explore works from any of the major literary traditions outside the British and American. The specific selections and authors vary each term according to the theme. This is an upper-level course involving close reading, analysis and writing in seminar format. Not available every semester. Global marker.
Prerequisites:
ENG-200 and one literature course or permission of instructor

Select Two of the Following:

LIT-323: Studies in Drama
This course will focus on drama as a literary genre, examining the origins of the genre, its literary conventions and its current productions. In reading plays that may range from the Greeks to contemporary Broadway, students will not only see the changing dynamics of the genres form, but also experience the important role the genre has played in American, British, European, and global society and culture.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
LIT-325: Studies in the Novel
This course will focus on the novel as a literary genre tracing its intricate conventions, its historical origins, and its current manifestations. In reading novels from the 18th through 21st centuries, students will learn not only the complex dynamics of the genre's form but also the critical influence the novel has had on society, cultural and politics over the centuries.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
LIT-327: Studies in Poetry
This course will focus on poetry as a literary genre. Students will learn how to interpret and evaluate poetry, exploring the elements of poetic form as well as influence poetic responses to critical moments in history. Thus, we will read landmark works by major poets, learn about major movements and schools within poetry, and look at poetry written in response to historical events. Students will also read a volume of poetry by a poet of their choice, and present information on that poets style, theme, and role within the field of poetry.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H

Select One of the Following (American Literature):

LIT-221: American Literature I
This course is a survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1865. The course will provide students with an introduction to the early history of American literature, examining a broad range of literary genres and considering the complex cultural and social context in which these important literary texts were written. Authors may include John Winthrop, Benjamin Franklin, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Harriet Ann Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-222: American Literature II
This course is a survey of American literature from 1865 to the present. The course will provide students with an introduction to the history of American literature since the Civil War, examining a broad range of literary genres and considering the complex cultural and social context in which these important literary texts were written. Authors may include Mark Twain, Henry James, Jack London, Gertrude Stein, Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, Eugene O'Neill, Langston Hughes, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Allen Ginsberg, and Toni Morrison.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-312: Early American Literature
While the authors and texts studied in this course may vary, the readings will cover the historical period from 1620- with the settlement of Plymouth Plantation- through the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and the early days of the new Republic. Although there may be some attention to the literature of early discovery, the emphasis will be on literary texts of major historical interest and on authors who pursued the American Dream of economic, religious, political, and artistic freedom.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-313: The American Renaissance
While the authors and texts studied in this course may vary, this course examines literature from the early 1800s to 1965, the conclusion of the Civil War. During this period, American literature developed a home-grown Romanticism influenced by European intellectual and aesthetic movements, as well as a new cultural sensibility of its own. Authors may include Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Douglass, Dickinson, and the latter-day transcendentalism of Whitman.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-314: American Realism and Naturalism
While the authors and texts studied in this course may vary, this course will focus on the American literature between 1865-1914, with the progression of literary culture from Romanticism to Realism and Naturalism and towards Modernism. Students will read literature by authors who were responding to radical shifts in America after the Civil War, including Reconstruction, the rise of industrialism, and the new theories of evolution. Authors may include Twain, James, Chesnutt, London Dreiser, Wharton, Cather, and Anderson, as well as poets of the early twentieth century.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-315: 20th Century American Literature
The course will explore literature by major American writers, from the early 20th century to the present. Students will read fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and plays about the major literary, cultural, and political events during the 20th century, including the wars, the Beat and counterculture movements, the Civil Rights and women's movements, and post 9/11 cultural shifts. We will proceed chronologically, beginning with poetry about World War I and ending with post-modern literature about contemporary issues such as race, religion, technology, and war.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H

Select One of the Following (British Literature):

LIT-219: British Literature I
This course is designed to introduce students to British literature from its beginnings through the eighteenth century. Students will read and discuss works by major authors, considering such aspects as the work's genre, context, and style.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10 and ENG-120 or ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-220: British Literature II
This course is designed to introduce students to British literature from the Romantic through the Modernist periods. Students will read and discuss works by major authors, considering such aspects of the work's genre, context, and style.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-306: Medieval Literature
This course will focus on literature written in England during the Old and Middle English period (approximately 500-1485 CE). We will spend about half the course on Old English literature and half on Middle English literature.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-308: 18th Century British Literature
This course surveys the literature of the "long 18th century," from the Restoration to the beginning of Romanticism, and studies developments in English literature such as the novel, the essay, satire, journalism, and popular theater. Authors studied may include Congreve, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Fielding, Smollett, and Austen. This course may also cover developments in the visual arts. Themes of the course will vary, but may include civil liberty, sexuality and gender, colonialism, city and country and the enlightenment movement.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-309: Romantic Literature
The Romantic Era in Britain, while short, was an intense and influential literary period. In this course we will read poetry, fiction, and nonfiction responding to and shaping events such as the French Revolution and its aftermath, the British abolition of slavery, and industrialization. We will read author such as Wordsworth, Keats, Austen, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Shelley, and Byron.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-310: Victorian Literature
Nineteenth-century Britain experienced tremendous change in politics, economics, philosophy, art and literature. It was a century of industrialization, empire-building, new discoveries and social revolution. This course studies representative selections from the major poets and prose writers and explores the social, political and intellectual changes reflected in the literature of the Victorian period. Authors may include Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, and Wilde.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-311: Modern British Literature
This course will explore the modernist movement in 20th century British fiction through the works of three of its most prominent practitioners - James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, and Virginia Woolf - as well as selected works by other writers. The course will examine the birth of the modern aesthetic in literature not only as a response to the alienation and despair resulting from World War I but also as a reaction to the enormous impact made by the ideas of such thinkers as Darwin, Freud, Marx and Nietzsche. Various modernist writing techniques, including stream-of-consciousness, episodic narrative and radical experimentation with punctuation, will also be studied.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200

Select One of the Following (World Literature):

LIT-229: World Mythology
This course introduces students to the study of mythology. We will read and discuss myths from both western and non-western cultures. Students will also choose one cultures myth to concentrate on for a final project.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-328: Multi-Ethnic Literature: Describing the Hyphen
Since the beginnings of American literature, writers have been concerned with defining and creating American identity through their art. Since the 1960s, during and after the Civil Rights movement, numerous writers have defined their American identity in relation to specific ethnic identities, writing works that explore how dual or multiple cultural identities coexist within themselves and within American culture, sorting through the stories they've heard and created about who they are. In this course, we will read fiction, poetry, and essays by twentieth-century American authors who identify with African American, Native American, Asian American, Jewish, Latino and Chicano heritages. In addition to race and ethnicity, we will discuss how class, native language, religion, gender, sexuality, and history figures into these writers' images of an American self and community.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
LIT-330: Gender and Text
This course examines gender in and through literary texts, and considers the ways in which categories of sexuality, sex, race, class, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and other factors influence writers? depictions of gender. The course analyzes historical conditions relevant to gender studies, and may address social and theoretical topics such as women's suffrage, feminisms, third-world feminism, the LGBTQ community, and queer theory. The course explores these topics through the lens of literature and asks: how is gender represented in literary texts? how do literary texts not only replicate but sometimes contest or imagine new realities for gendered subjects? what does it mean to write as a gendered subject? Readings may include works by authors such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzald a, and Michael Cunningham.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
LIT-350: The Black Literary Tradition
This course offers an overview of African-American literature, with glimpses into African and Caribbean literature. Beginning around 1845 with Frederick Douglass' Narrative, students will read from various literary genres, including slave narratives, poetry, short stories, fiction and plays that illuminate both the history of African America and changing ideas of race. Students will conduct ongoing independent research, which they will present to the class, on the major literacy and historical periods we cover, including the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and early 1930s, the civil rights movement(s), the Black Arts movement of the 1960s and early 1970s and the decades following. Reading works by Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Dubois, Zora Neale Thurston, Ralph Ellison, Gwendolyn Brooks, Chinua Achebe, Toni Morrison and Ishmael Reed, among others, will enable us to analyze how sexuality, gender, class and nationality influence various writers' definitions of race and ethnicity. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H

Select One of the Following:

ENG-327: Play Writing Workshop
This course is a roundtable forum in which 10 to 15 students will write stage plays of various lengths using traditional and experimental methods and forms. Members of the class will produce at intervals to be established by the instructor and will take turns presenting their works to the group for comment and discussion. The class will produce some student plays during the term. May not be used as a literature elective. Not available every semester. Writing Intensive Course.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
ENG-329: Fiction Writing Workshop
This course is a roundtable forum in which 10 to 15 students will write short or long fiction using the techniques of 19th-century realism as well as modernist and experimental techniques. Members of the class will produce on a weekly basis and take turns presenting their manuscripts to the group for commentary and discussion. May not be used as a literature elective. Not available every semester.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
ENG-330: Nonfiction Writing Workshop
This course introduces students to the basic skills and principles of writing creative nonfiction and magazine feature articles. Student-centered workshop critiques and frequent conferences with the instructor are the primary methods used in the course. The course includes significant reading assignments in nonfiction genres.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H

Certification Courses

EDU-200: Introduction to Education
This course gives students an overview of American education through analysis of its historical and philosophical roots. Contemporary issues in American education are emphasized. Non-education majors may use this course as a social science elective.
EDU-208: Assessment, Accountability and Teaching in the Classroom
This basic course for classroom teachers explores various techniques necessary for designing and implementing authentic measures to assess successful student learning.
Prerequisites:
MUE-261, EDU-270, 271 or 220
EDU-235: Learning with Technology
This course develops students' knowledge and skill with technology with the ultimate aim of using technology to enhance student learning and achievement. This course also introduces students to learning target (standards/outcomes) and a general model of curriculum development, implementation and assessment. Offered every fall and spring.
EDU-312: Writing Workshop for Educators
This class is designed to help future teachers to fine-tune their own writing, while they learn ways to incorporate writing into their teaching. The course inspires future teachers to enjoy the possibilities of writing in their classrooms, so their students will also. An examination of a wide array of useful classroom approaches will promote better reading and learning and support differentiation. Well-designed writing assessments promote critical thinking as well as higher levels of literacy. Topics will include prewriting techniques, using art and music to promote writing, unlocking the secret to assigning interesting and useful journals, techniques for painless peer editing, practices that streamline grading of papers, and how to find and incorporate excellent models for writing.
Prerequisites:
EDU-200 and ENG-121 or ENG-200
SPED-260: Children with Exceptionalities
This course provides students with deep understanding of children with disabilities and specific characteristics of disabilities and how they impact learning in the general curriculum. Students will examine and be prepared to define ways in which such disabilities are diagnosed and possible strategies and techniques (to include assistive technology) to assist the student in the general classroom to the extent possible. Tiered Support Systems will be discussed as a general education initiative that can serve the needs of all students. Students will research resources available for families and schools to support the needs of disabled children. The role of the family and school as partners will be developed as a critical technique to serve the needs of students, as well as facilitating effective meetings and communication efforts that must be part of the role of special educator.

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