Liberal Arts (AA) - Curriculum

Gain a solid foundation in general knowledge and enjoy exposure to a range of subjects when you earn an associate’s degree in liberal arts at SNHU. Seven core courses prepare you for further study and deliver a solid set of skills that are valuable both in the workplace and in furthering your education. Because these courses are part of the SNHU four-year degree core curriculum, they smoothly integrate with any of the four-year degree programs, if you choose to continue your studies.

The two remaining core courses help you begin your search for a major, in areas such as political science, psychology, sociology, history, literature and science. An additional six elective courses allow you to further focus your studies in an area of concentration, even within the two-year liberal arts degree program. If you are a transfer student, these electives may align with many of the courses that you wish to transfer from another institution. 

Courses in this program satisfy some requirements of the university's four-year degree programs.

Liberal Arts Major Courses

COM-212: Public Speaking
This course is designed to help students develop abilities, including organization and delivery skills, for all speaking situations. The evaluation and improvement of voice, diction, articulation and posture also are studied. May not be used as literature elective.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120, ENG-121H ENG-200 or ENG-200H
ENG-120: College Composition I
ENG 120 is a college-level writing course that introduces students to various forms of academic discourse. Students are required to prepare essays in a variety of rhetorical modes, including exposition, description and argumentation. In addition to out-of-class writing assignments, students will be required to compose in-class essays in response to readings and other prompts. ENG 120 introduces students to process-writing techniques, library research and MLA documentation procedures. The primary focus of ENG 120 is to help students acquire the writing skills they need to succeed in an academic environment. Enrollment is kept intentionally small, typically 15 students per section, to assure maximum benefit.
ENG-200: Sophomore Seminar
This is a theme-based seminar that builds on the skills learned in SNHU-101 and ENG-120, focusing on information literacy (the ability to locate and evaluate information) as well as written and oral communication skills. The theme of the course will vary according to the instructor, but in all sections, students will conduct extensive research on the topic and communicate their knowledge in a variety of oral presentations and writing assignments that will culminate in a research paper. To be taken during the student's sophomore year.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H and sophomore standing or honors
FAS-201: Introduction to Humanities I
This course offers vocabulary, understanding and appreciation of the visual arts in their cultural contexts in history, religion, literature, music and ideas. It focuses on the achievements of ancient Greece and Rome, the medieval period and the Renaissance while also exploring related issues in non-European cultures. May be taken independently of FAS-202.
FAS-202: Introduction to Humanities II
This course offers vocabulary, understanding and appreciation of the visual arts in their cultural contexts in history, religion, literature, music and ideas. It focuses on the cultural periods of the Baroque, the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Early Modernism while also exploring related issues in non-European cultures. May be taken independently of FAS-201.
IT-100: Introduction to Information Technology
This is the fundamental computer fluency course required for all Southern New Hampshire University students. It is designed to promote a working knowledge and understanding of computer information technology concepts, skills and capabilities that support academic and professionally related goals and requirements. Students learn about the application and science of information technology. Concepts to master include the fundamentals of computer information technologies along with issues that affect people today such as : Internet and other network technologies, web publishing, digital media, hardware, software, file and database management, information security, viruses, and spyware, social impact, as well as algorithmic thinking and the limits of computation. Students develop capabilities such a managing complexity, assessing the quality of information, collaborating and communicating using IT, anticipating technological change and thinking abstractly and critically about IT. Students develop computer-related skills in support of their college studies and career goals. This is accomplished, in part, by the mastery of word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software.

HIS ELE - Students may select one History elective
LIT ELE - Students may select one Literature elective
PHL ELE - Students may select one Philosophy elective
SCI ELE - Students may select one Science elective

Select One of the Following:

MAT-130: Applied Finite Mathematics
This course is designed to prepare students for other courses in the core curriculum and in their majors and to provide a basis for making decisions in life after graduation. Topics include mathematics of finance, probability and counting, descriptive statistics and basic linear regression. (Students who have successfully completed MAT 120 or MAT 150 may not register for MAT 130).
MAT-135: The Heart of Mathematics
In this course, students will consider beautiful and profound mathematical concepts on par with the great works of Shakespeare, Plato and Michelangelo in the realms of literature, philosophy and the arts. Topics may include numerical patterns in the nature, the golden rectangle, Platonic solids, topological equivalence, symmetry, prime numbers, infinity, fractals and other subjects.
MAT-140: Precalculus
This course emphasizes the algebra and concepts of functions. Students will learn the properties and graphing techniques for different types of functions including: linear, polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Students will also learn to solve a variety of real world problems that rely on a number of different problem solving strategies and an understanding of these different types of functions.
MAT-210: Applied Calculus I
This is an introductory course in single-variable calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation, integration and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will gain experience solving real-world problems involving calculus, including problems in business, economics, natural sciences and social sciences.
MAT-211: Applied Calculus II
This course is a continuation of MAT 210. Topics include integration by parts, functions of several variables, trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, differential equations, Taylor polynomials and infinite series. Students will learn applications in business, economics, natural sciences and social sciences.
Prerequisites:
MAT-210 with a grade of C or better; or AP Calculus with exam grade of 3 or better
MAT-230: Discrete Mathematics
Discrete mathematics is the study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete rather than continuous. That is, in contrast to the real numbers that vary continuously, the objects of study in discrete mathematics take on distinct, separated values. Topics include operations on sets, logic, truth tables, counting, relations and digraphs, functions, trees and graph theory. A significant goal of this course is to improve students' critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.
MAT-240: Applied Statistics
This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.
MAT-299: Mathematical Proof and Problem Solving
This course introduces students to the language and methods used to create and write mathematical proofs and solve problems. Methods of proof will include: direct, contrapositive, contradiction, and induction. Methods of problem solving will be based on Polya's four steps for problem solving. Students will learn about and utilize the many functions of proof including: verification, explanation, communication, discovery, justification, and inquiry. The course will also explore the relationship between problem solving and the process of proving. Students will explore fundamental abstract concepts in mathematics including: functions and relations, set theory, number theory, and logic.
Prerequisites:
MAT-230 with a grade of C or better

Select Two of the Following:

General Education Core - Social and Behavioral Science (ESBS)

Free Electives: 15 credits
Liberal Arts Electives: 6 credits
Total: 60 credits

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