Justice Studies - Crime and Criminology Certificate

For students in majors other than the B.S. in Justice Studies, non-matriculated students, part-time students, and other students by approval of Department Chair to be comprised of the following:

Crime & Criminology Certificate Required Courses

JUS-101: Introduction to Criminal Justice
This course covers the nature, scope and impact of crime in the United States, independent and interdependent operations and procedures of police, courts and corrections, and introductory theories of crime and delinquency. The course introduces the justice model in a systematic way whereby students delve into the numerous components of the justice system including law enforcement, legal and judicial process and correctional operations. Career opportunities will be fully covered throughout the course.
JUS-215: The Victim and the Justice System
This course will examine issues surrounding the central character in a criminal act - the victim. Contents are designed to develop an understanding of what it means to be victimized, including the physical, psychological, and economic impact of crime upon victims, their families, and society in general. Special consideration will be given to specific victim populations (i.e. survivors of homicides, sexual assault, and family violence), secondary victimization by the criminal system, victim assistance programs, and future trends in this field. A full review of how the American justice system has responded to the needs of victims is part of the course content and includes a look at victim testimony at sentencing and parole and probation hearings, victim notification, Meghan's law, victim advisory and protection services, and other means in which the judicial system assures victim participation during the adjudicative phase.
POL-306: The American Legal Tradition
This course offers a broad introduction to the American legal tradition, including the structure and function of the courts, the legal profession, legal education, and the politics of judicial selection. As an introduction to what it means to "think like a lawyer" in the United States, students learn how to write parts of a predictive legal memorandum of the type that first-year law students learn how to write, in which they analyze a legal issue of concern to hypothetical clients by applying the reasoning and conclusions in selected judicial opinions to the facts of the clients' case.
Prerequisites:
GOV-110 or POL-210

Students may select either JUS-101 or POL-306.

Select two (2) of the following courses not otherwise completed as a requirement for the B.S. in Justice Studies major or other Justice Studies concentration/certificate:

JUS-211: Organized Crime
A complete examination of the dynamic referred to as 'organized crime' commencing with its historical underpinnings. Specific crimes, like racketeering, extortion, bribery, official corruption, graft, drugs, prostitution and other illicit trafficking will be analyzed. Investigative techniques and prosecutorial strategies that relate to the identification and elimination of organized crime are a major component of the course content.
JUS-305: International Criminal Justice
This course compares and contrasts the criminal justice system of the United States with the systems of other countries on a substantive and procedural basis. A thorough examination of other cultural models of law and justice in order that differences in justice processing and definition become apparent. Some emphasis is placed on international policing and legal enforcement, whether through INTERPOL, treaty or other regulation.
JUS-309: White Collar Crime
This course considers crime committed by corporations as well as white collar criminals; how such crimes are defined, who commits or is victimized by it, which moral, ethical, legal and social contexts promote it and how society responds. Procedural and policy considerations in the investigation and enforcement of relevant statutes will also be covered, including the concept of legal privilege, the role of the grand jury and other pre-trial processes, evidentiary questions, litigation strategies, and potential sanctions and other punishments.
JUS-429: Terrorism
Examines current terrorism, its origins and ideological bases, with particular attention to its relation to political institutions and the criminal justice process. Specific attention is given methods and means of the terrorist, motivations and modus operandi trends and predictability and law enforcement's multi-faceted reactions to its many devious forms. Legislative efforts to curb the scourge of terrorism are also highlighted.
JUS-468: Crimes Against Children
This is a course that examines criminal activity targeted against children. The course will focus on the physical and sexual abuse, neglect, kidnapping, and sexual exploitation of children. Students will explore methods of identifying victims, investigating offenders, and court presentation of criminal cases. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of the relationship between victims and offenders and how that is a factor in the investigation and prosecution of criminal acts.
PSY-205: Forensic Psychology
Students will learn how psychology, as a science and a practice, applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. Emphasis will be placed on witness testimony and the social psychology of the courtroom. Topics will include recovered memories, adolescent violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders.
Prerequisites:
PSY-108 or PSY-108H
PSY-215: Abnormal Psychology
This course offers students an opportunity to better understand human behavior. It also studies the similarities and differences between normal and abnormal reactions to environmental stimuli. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
PSY-108 or PSY-108H
PSY-310: Criminal Psychology
This course will provide the student with insights about crime from a psychological perspective. Specifically, the course will focus on how a criminal offender is influenced by multiple systems within the psychosocial environment. This course examines and evaluates the role of psychological factors in understanding the motives behind antisocial acts. Throughout the course, students will acquire knowledge and practice in the application of psychological methods to understanding criminal behavior.
Prerequisites:
PSY-108
SOC-213: Sociology of Social Problems
Students in this course analyze contemporary social problems in America and other societies. Issues include economic limitations, class and poverty, race and ethnic relations, sexism, ageism, and environmental and population concerns. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112
SOC-324: Sociology of Crime and Violence
The course examines the nature, causes, and consequences of crime and violence to a society. Applying a legal and sociological perspective, the course examines: 1) the structure of the law and the criminal justice system; 2) the nature and causation of criminal behavior; and 3) the various types of crime and criminality.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112
SOC-326: Sociology of Deviant Behavior
This course is a sociological analysis of the nature, cause, and societal reactions to deviant behavior, including mental illness, suicide, drug and alcohol addiction and sexual deviation. Offered every other year.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112

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