Justice Studies (AS)

UG_Justice_Studies_AS

Go for an Associate of Science in Justice Studies

Go discover the inner workings and the broad scope of the American justice system through the Southern New Hampshire University Associate of Science (AS) in Justice Studies program.

Unlike programs that focus on only one aspect of the justice model, such as law enforcement, SNHU’s AS in Justice Studies provides an overview of the entire justice system.

Students tailor the program according to their career goals. All students take courses in policing and law enforcement, crime and criminology, and law and legal processes. In light of the professional nature of the justice system, students also are encouraged to explore courses in such aligned areas as business, psychology, sociology, information technology, and political science.

Course work

Students may complete the program in the traditional two years or through an accelerated schedule including an internship. In addition, students may continue on with the Bachelor of Science (BS) program or the MS in Justice Studies allowing students to advance both their education and employment opportunities.

Why pursue an AS in justice studies at Southern New Hampshire University?

  • Faculty with specialized work experience
  • Internship opportunity that combines traditional research with local agency experience
  • Professionally oriented program
  • Career placement support

Career Opportunities

Graduates will find the job outlook in the justice studies industry is healthy. According the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, a wide variety of positions in government agencies such as in the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Agency and U.S. Marshals Department are expected to see a 13.4 percent growth through 2016.

SNHU Justice Studies graduates have a wealth of career opportunities in:
  • Law
  • Business Security
  • Police and Law Enforcement
  • Federal Service Agencies
  • Terrorism Prevention
  • Court Administration
  • Corrections
  • Dispute Resolution
  • Victim Advocacy
  • Military

Justice Studies Major Courses

COM-212: Public Speaking
This course is designed to help students develop abilities, including organization and delivery skills, for all speaking situations. The evaluation and improvement of voice, diction, articulation and posture also are studied. May not be used as literature elective.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120, ENG-121H ENG-200 or ENG-200H
ENG-120: College Composition I
ENG 120 is a college-level writing course that introduces students to various forms of academic discourse. Students are required to prepare essays in a variety of rhetorical modes, including exposition, description and argumentation. In addition to out-of-class writing assignments, students will be required to compose in-class essays in response to readings and other prompts. ENG 120 introduces students to process-writing techniques, library research and MLA documentation procedures. The primary focus of ENG 120 is to help students acquire the writing skills they need to succeed in an academic environment. Enrollment is kept intentionally small, typically 15 students per section, to assure maximum benefit.
ENG-121: College Composition II
ENG 121 is the sequel to ENG 120. This course concentrates on argumentative writing and requires students to prepare a major research report, one that reveals fluency with argumentative strategies and rhetorical conventions. In addition, students are introduced to analytical reading techniques, critical research methods and current documentation procedures. Although other kinds of writing are commonly assigned in ENG 121, argumentation remains the major focus of study. Enrollment is kept intentionally small, typically 15 students per section, to assure maximum benefit.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
IT-100: Introduction to Information Technology
This is the fundamental computer fluency course required for all Southern New Hampshire University students. It is designed to promote a working knowledge and understanding of computer information technology concepts, skills and capabilities that support academic and professionally related goals and requirements. Students learn about the application and science of information technology. Concepts to master include the fundamentals of computer information technologies along with issues that affect people today such as : Internet and other network technologies, web publishing, digital media, hardware, software, file and database management, information security, viruses, and spyware, social impact, as well as algorithmic thinking and the limits of computation. Students develop capabilities such a managing complexity, assessing the quality of information, collaborating and communicating using IT, anticipating technological change and thinking abstractly and critically about IT. Students develop computer-related skills in support of their college studies and career goals. This is accomplished, in part, by the mastery of word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software.
IT-210: Business Systems Analysis and Design
This course provides students with the necessary level of information technology education relative to understanding the uses and roles of information systems in business organizations. Students receive instruction on the information concepts and methodologies associated with the development of business information systems, and their effective application to the solution of business problems. Students learn the major issues of managing information technology in the contemporary business environment and the relationship between organizations' structures and information technology. Team approaches are utilized along with structured computer laboratories and cases using spreadsheet and database management tools. Writing intensive course.
JUS-101: Introduction to Criminal Justice
This course covers the nature, scope and impact of crime in the United States, independent and interdependent operations and procedures of police, courts and corrections, and introductory theories of crime and delinquency. The course introduces the justice model in a systematic way whereby students delve into the numerous components of the justice system including law enforcement, legal and judicial process and correctional operations. Career opportunities will be fully covered throughout the course.
JUS-102: American Policing
An introduction to the police system in America, which is the gateway to the criminal justice process. Topics considered include the historical foundations of police processes, occupational roles and tasks of law enforcement, and the nature and designs of typical, as well as innovative, police systems. Perennial problems of policing, particularly as it relates to community interaction, are also essential components of the course.
JUS-103: Correctional Systems
This course examines the management, structure, and organizational design of correctional institutions. Correctional planning, construction, program evaluation and community interaction will be considered and improvement strategies for correctional operations will be debated and critiqued. The course provides a broad based overview of the correctional system which incarcerates and confines, treats, and reclaims criminal personalities and protects and serves the state and the community by removing threats to the social order.
JUS-104: Introduction to Security
A basic overview of private sector justice is the course's chief aim. Types of security operations and functions comprises much of the course coverage including perimeter and physical security, intelligence gathering, retail and industrial security, terrorism and executive protection as well as security in select business and industrial centers. Careers, regulation and licensure, and the debate on professionalization are other areas of major intellectual concern.
JUS-215: The Victim and the Justice System
This course will examine issues surrounding the central character in a criminal act - the victim. Contents are designed to develop an understanding of what it means to be victimized, including the physical, psychological, and economic impact of crime upon victims, their families, and society in general. Special consideration will be given to specific victim populations (i.e. survivors of homicides, sexual assault, and family violence), secondary victimization by the criminal system, victim assistance programs, and future trends in this field. A full review of how the American justice system has responded to the needs of victims is part of the course content and includes a look at victim testimony at sentencing and parole and probation hearings, victim notification, Meghan's law, victim advisory and protection services, and other means in which the judicial system assures victim participation during the adjudicative phase.
JUS-375: Criminal Law
An introduction to substantive criminal law that reviews the social, philosophical, and legal foundations of criminal codification. In addition, the course covers the historical development of criminal law in the U.S. Other subject matters include parties to crimes including principals/accessories, criminal capacity, criminal elements, e.g. mens rea, actus rea, and the specific crimes against person, property, and public order. Lastly, the course captures criminal law from the defendant's perspective by reviewing the accuser's mental states, potential defenses and uses of mitigation.
JUS-455: Legal Traditions
This course encompasses a complete examination of the law, its origins, roots and underpinnings in a jurisprudential context. Coverage includes a focused examination of classical, medieval and contemporary legal thinkers. Problems of personal privacy, sexual freedom, procreative control, the imposition of penalties, and notions of good will be considered. Course participants will consider these questions: What is law? Is law related to religion and morality? What are the foundations of law in Western Culture? Can law, ethics and morality be differentiated? How can a legal system be just? Can law shape morality or does morality shape law? How does Western legal tradition resolve ethical questions such as abortion, suicide, euthanasia, and the death penalty? Is there a unified vision of law that consists of the good, of virtue and the idea of justice?

Select One of the Following:

MAT-130: Applied Finite Mathematics
This course is designed to prepare students for other courses in the core curriculum and in their majors and to provide a basis for making decisions in life after graduation. Topics include mathematics of finance, probability and counting, descriptive statistics and basic linear regression. (Students who have successfully completed MAT 120 or MAT 150 may not register for MAT 130).
MAT-140: Precalculus
This course emphasizes the algebra and concepts of functions. Students will learn the properties and graphing techniques for different types of functions including: linear, polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Students will also learn to solve a variety of real world problems that rely on a number of different problem solving strategies and an understanding of these different types of functions.
MAT-210: Applied Calculus I
This is an introductory course in single-variable calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation, integration and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will gain experience solving real-world problems involving calculus, including problems in business, economics, natural sciences and social sciences.
MAT-230: Discrete Mathematics
Discrete mathematics is the study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete rather than continuous. That is, in contrast to the real numbers that vary continuously, the objects of study in discrete mathematics take on distinct, separated values. Topics include operations on sets, logic, truth tables, counting, relations and digraphs, functions, trees and graph theory. A significant goal of this course is to improve students' critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.
MAT-240: Applied Statistics
This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

Select two BA/BS Core (Required Courses may differ based on program) Electives
Select two B.S. Justice Studies Major Course Requirements
Select two Free Electives

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