Psychology (BA)

 

Analyze and Explore the Mind as an SNHU Psychology Major

Earn your Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Southern New Hampshire University and become well versed in major psychological concepts, human behavior and research methods. You’ll develop critical thinking and communications skills important to communicating effectively in many formats. And you’ll also enjoy small class sizes and easy access to expert faculty and dedicated advisors.

As a psychology major at SNHU, you can tailor your program with electives focused on your area of interest in psychology. Choose a degree concentration in Child and Adolescent Psychology, Mental Health or Forensic Psychology. Each path prepares you for careers in community, school and business settings and creates a solid foundation for graduate studies.

Experiential Learning Opportunities

In the SNHU psychology major, you may choose to engage in any number of practical learning experiences as an intern or volunteer. This may include gaining firsthand experience at organizations such as the Concord Mental Health Court, Manchester Mental Health Center or Riverbend Community Mental Health. Or, you may work with faculty on research, presentations and publishing.

In addition to taking seven required and four elective psychology courses, you will take core liberal arts courses and 21 credits of free electives. This coursework will enhance your knowledge and understanding of applications in psychology, as well as help you develop strong communication and critical thinking skills.

Psychology Major Curriculum

Required Core Courses

General Education Program

School of Arts and Sciences Required Courses

BIO-210: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
Discussion/comparison of the principles of mammalian form and function. Includes molecular and cellular mechanisms of major processes (such as muscle contraction, neural transmission, and signal transduction) and examines the structure and function of the 11 organ systems of the human body. Laboratory exercises (BIO-210L) to follow lecture topics.

Choose two of the following:

JUS-101: Introduction to Criminal Justice
This course covers the nature, scope and impact of crime in the United States, independent and interdependent operations and procedures of police, courts and corrections, and introductory theories of crime and delinquency. The course introduces the justice model in a systematic way whereby students delve into the numerous components of the justice system including law enforcement, legal and judicial process and correctional operations. Career opportunities will be fully covered throughout the course.
JUS-325: Law, Justice and Family
A full-fledged review of the justice system's response to the establishment and maintenance of family in the American culture. How the family is defined, its heritage of rights and protections and the differentiated roles of parent and child are central considerations. Further review includes a look at family dissolution, divorce, custody and support disputes and the ongoing problems of visitation. The emerging problems of spousal and child abuse will be keenly analyzed and how the legal systems provide protection from these abuses will be closely scrutinized.
JUS-468: Crimes Against Children
This is a course that examines criminal activity targeted against children. The course will focus on the physical and sexual abuse, neglect, kidnapping, and sexual exploitation of children. Students will explore methods of identifying victims, investigating offenders, and court presentation of criminal cases. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of the relationship between victims and offenders and how that is a factor in the investigation and prosecution of criminal acts.
JUS-485: Forensic Law
An interdisciplinary course covering law, criminal justice, science, and technological issues in the evidentiary arena. Coverage in the course provides a broad-based assessment of expert witnesses, microanalysis, pathological evidence, admissibility and investigatory practice, ballistics, fingerprints, vascar/radar, and photographic techniques. Contrasted with criminalistics, subject matter of this course is primarily evidentiary. More particularly, the course will delve into the rules of evidence, which guide the admissibility of forensic evidence in a court of law. Examination includes threshold tests for reliability and admissibility, qualification of witnesses competent to testify, scientific rigor required for admission and case law determinations on the use and abuse of scientific evidence.
POL-210: American Politics
This course offers a broad introduction to the structure and function of the American political system at the national level, including the roles played by the president, Congress, the courts, the bureaucracy, political parties, interest groups and the mass media in the policy- making and electoral processes. This course places special emphasis on how the efforts of the framers of the Constitution to solve what they saw as the political problems of their day continue to shape American national politics in ours.
POL-306: The American Legal Tradition
This course offers a broad introduction to the American legal tradition, including the structure and function of the courts, the legal profession, legal education, and the politics of judicial selection. As an introduction to what it means to "think like a lawyer" in the United States, students learn how to write parts of a predictive legal memorandum of the type that first-year law students learn how to write, in which they analyze a legal issue of concern to hypothetical clients by applying the reasoning and conclusions in selected judicial opinions to the facts of the clients' case.
Prerequisites:
GOV-110 or POL-210
SCI-215: Contemporary Health
This course exposes students to the three major dimensions of health -- physical, emotional and social. Health, nutrition, substance abuse, infectious diseases and stress management are among the issues that will be discussed. Students will learn to intelligently relate health knowledge to the social issues of our day. For students on program plans/catalogs prior to 2012-13; this course does not satisfy the university core science requirement.
SOC-213: Sociology of Social Problems
Students in this course analyze contemporary social problems in America and other societies. Issues include economic limitations, class and poverty, race and ethnic relations, sexism, ageism, and environmental and population concerns. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112
SOC-317: Sociology of the Family
This course is a sociological examination of the family institution in America and other societies. Traditional and nontraditional family patterns are studied to provide students with a structure for understanding sex, marriage, family and kinship systems. Offered every other year.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112
SOC-320: Sociology of Gender
The examination of gender in society. Students will explore the social construction of gender, gender identity development, sexuality and power, and other aspects concerning the meanings and implications of being 'male', 'female', or 'transgendered'.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112
SOC-326: Sociology of Deviant Behavior
This course is a sociological analysis of the nature, cause, and societal reactions to deviant behavior, including mental illness, suicide, drug and alcohol addiction and sexual deviation. Offered every other year.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112
SOC-328: Sociology of Aging
Students in this course examine the basic social processes and problems of aging. Social and psychological issues and issues involved with death and dying are discussed. Offered every other year.
Prerequisites:
SOC-112

Psychology Degree Major Courses

PSY-108: Introduction to Psychology
This course provides students an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Students prepare for more advanced concepts in upper-level Psychology courses by learning the basics of how to evaluate research and exploring various areas of specialization within the discipline. Offered every semester.
PSY-223: Research I: Statistics for Psychology
How do psychologists organize, summarize, and interpret information? Students in this course study applications of statistical methods in psychological research and practice. The emphasis of the course is on the conceptual understanding of statistics so that students can read and conduct psychological research; those skills will be applied to students' original projects in Research Methods II: Methodology & Design. Computation of tests will be conducted on the computer. Students will build upon statistical knowledge and develop an in-depth conceptual and practical understanding of hypothesis testing, tests of significance, standardization, correlation, and analysis of variance in a wide variety of psychological uses. Students will learn the theory of statistical decisions, practical application of statistical software, and how to analyze journal articles. This course typically should be completed during the first semester of the sophomore year.
Prerequisites:
MAT-240
PSY-224: Research II: Scientific Investigations
Students in this course will develop an understanding a variety of research methods, including experimental, survey, correlation and case-history techniques. They will become aware of the strengths and weaknesses of each method and understand when each method is best used. Offered every year. Writing intensive course.
Prerequisites:
PSY-108 or PSY-108H and MAT-240 or MAT-245
PSY-444: Senior Seminar in Psychology
This capstone course integrates previous classroom and practical experience with a focus on current issues in psychology. This course likely will include cross-cultural aspects of psychology, ethics, recent career trends in psychology and other topics dictated by current events in psychology. Coverage may change over time, but the basic focus on integrating the past and anticipating the future for psychology seniors will be the major concern. Offered every year. Writing Intensive Course.
Prerequisites:
PSY-224 and three from: PSY-211, 215, 216, 257, 30

PSY ELE - Students may select four Psychology electives

Psychology Major Outcomes

As a psychology major at SNHU, you’ll gain a thorough understanding of psychological principles and how to apply them to social and organizational issues. At the conclusion of your psychology program, you’ll be able to:

  • Understand human thought and behavior concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, trends and ethical issues
  • Demonstrate psychological knowledge, skills and values during experiential learning experiences
  • Develop insight into behaviors and mental processes and apply effective management and improvement strategies
  • Apply fundamental research methods in psychology: research design, data analysis and interpretation
  • Use major research methodologies to critique, analyze and interpret results of psychological research
  • Display effective written and oral communication skills, correct use of APA format and extensive computer skills

Future Opportunities

A bachelor’s in psychology from SNHU opens up a world of opportunities. If you’re eager to join the workforce, you might consider the fields of counseling, case management, social work, community outreach or others that stress interpersonal relations and human resource management.

Our students with an undergraduate degree in psychology are also accepted into top graduate schools, with some accepted directly into PhD programs. SNHU psychology department faculty helps students tailor their undergraduate studies with graduate school or specialized study in mind.

Message from the Psychology Department Chair

Graduates of the Southern New Hampshire University psychology degree program have a strong liberal arts background and pursue graduate studies in psychology or other social sciences

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University Accreditation

SNHU is a fully accredited university. Access our list of accreditations. More...

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