Bachelor’s Degrees in Information Technologies - Curriculum

Tailor Your Online Information Technology Degree to Your Needs

At Southern New Hampshire University, you can choose between two bachelor’s in information technology degree programs: the liberal arts-based Bachelor of Arts or the business-focused Bachelor of Science.

The BA in Information Technologies degree program focuses on developing a broad array of IT skills. Because the BA program offers six free elective courses, you have the flexibility to take the course that interest you the most, like web design, robotics, database management or cybersecurity.

The BS in Information Technologies degree program focuses on developing information technology skills but also gives you a foundation in business. You’ll gain the skills you need to take on management and leadership roles in your organization. To enhance your online information technology degree, you can elect a concentration in one of 9 specialized areas of information technology.

BA in Information Technologies Online Courses

Required Core Courses

ECO-201: Microeconomics
This course examines the role of economic systems in allocating scarce resources to satisfy the needs and wants of individual members of a society. After a brief exposure to alternative economic systems, the focus becomes the nature and performance of American capitalism. Primary emphasis is placed upon the development of models that explain the behavior of consumers, producers and resource suppliers in various market structures.
Prerequisites:
MAT-130, 140, 210, 240 or MAT-106 & MAT-206
MAT-240: Applied Statistics
This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

School of Arts and Sciences

BIO-210: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
Discussion/comparison of the principles of mammalian form and function. Includes molecular and cellular mechanisms of major processes (such as muscle contraction, neural transmission, and signal transduction) and examines the structure and function of the 11 organ systems of the human body. Laboratory exercises (BIO-210L) to follow lecture topics.
MAT-350: Applied Linear Algebra
This is a first course in linear algebra and matrices. Topics include systems of linear equations, linear independence, matrices of linear transformations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. After mastering the basic concepts and skills, students will use their knowledge of linear algebra to model a selection of applied mathematics problems in business, science, computer science and economics.
Prerequisites:
MAT-210 with a grade of C or better
SCI-219: Environmental Issues
This course covers a variety of environmental topics in a manner specifically designed for the non-science major. It provides a fundamental understanding of the various processes necessary to support life on Earth and examines how human activities and attitudes (individual, traditional, cultural, and others) generate environmental issues that threaten these processes. Topics include ecology, populations, agriculture, desertification and deforestation, water and ocean pollution, air pollution including ozone depletion, solid and hazardous wastes, energy including fossil fuels and nuclear power, economies and sustainability. This course is cross-listed as ENV-219.

Select one of the following:

SCI-218: Natural Resources
This class will introduce the concept of natural resources by studying topics such as land, soil, rangeland, forest, water, atmosphere, minerals, and energy. The management, use, and environmental impacts associated with these resources will also be studied. Emphasis will be placed on the United States within the context of the global environment.
SCI-220: Energy and Society
This course surveys the various forms of energy available to our industrial society. The environmental impact and depletion of each energy form is discussed with emphasis on the development of clean and inexhaustible alternative sources for the home and business. Topics include traditional and renewable energy sources, greenhouse effects, transpiration, nuclear power, and economies.

Major Courses

IT-145: Intro to Software Development
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the object-oriented programming paradigm. The course uses the Java programming language, which is totally object-oriented language, and the Java development environment to demonstrate the principles of object-oriented programming. Other languages, including Smalltalk, may be used for comparison. The course covers the Java language and the Java development environment, including the Java Software Development Kit (SDK) and Integrated Development Environment (IDE) tools. The course also covers the key concepts of object orientation, including inheritance, encapsulation, polymorphism and communication with messages. Other topics include classes and objects, base classes and class hierarchies, abstract and concrete classes. Offered every year. This is a programming course.
Prerequisites:
CIS-100 or IT-100
IT-200: Fundamentals of Information Technology
This course offers a broad introduction to the tools and applications students will need to become successful professionals in the IT environment. Students will examine the core information technologies of human-computer interaction, information management, programming, networking, web systems and technologies, as well as information assurance and security.
IT-201: Computer Platform Technologies
This course provides the hardware/software technology background for information technology personnel. Hardware topics include CPU architecture, memory, registers, addressing modes, busses, instruction sets and a variety of input/output devices. Software topics include operating system modules, process management, memory and file system management. Also included are basic network components and multi-user operating systems. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
CIS-100 or IT-100
IT-210: Business Systems Analysis and Design
This course provides students with the necessary level of information technology education relative to understanding the uses and roles of information systems in business organizations. Students receive instruction on the information concepts and methodologies associated with the development of business information systems, and their effective application to the solution of business problems. Students learn the major issues of managing information technology in the contemporary business environment and the relationship between organizations' structures and information technology. Team approaches are utilized along with structured computer laboratories and cases using spreadsheet and database management tools. Writing intensive course.
IT-270: Web Site Design
This course serves as an introduction to creating interactive pages for the World Wide Web. Specifically, it will survey Internet concepts, network protocols and client-server communications. The course covers HTML, the language of the World Wide Web; the Document Object Model (DOM), essential to creating and manipulating elements of a Web page under program control; CSS, the syntax for building consistent styles and appearances across Web pages; and JavaScript, the programming language that cements the various technologies together to facilitate dynamic interactive elements. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
IT-135 or IT-145
IT-315: Object Oriented Analysis and Design
This course develops software systems engineering principles combining object-oriented design principles and methods augmented by computer assisted engineering (CASE) technology. The course involves use of the unified modeling language (UML) and, through the vehicle of a student group project, applies these elements to the system development life cycle. This course is writing intensive, as student project teams are required to submit a comprehensive project report and a PowerPoint presentation. Specialized Systems Development Computer Laboratory intensive and open laboratory intensive. Offered every year. Writing intensive course.
Prerequisites:
CIS-200 or IT-210
IT-328: Project Management in Information Technology
This course the projects management strategies specific to IT projects, cost/benefit analysis, responsibilities of key stakeholders, project planning, and tracking tools.
IT-330: Database Design and Management
This course covers the design and implementation of information systems within a database management system environment. Students will demonstrate their mastery of the design process acquired in earlier courses by designing and constructing a physical system using database software to implement logical design. Topics include data models and modeling tools and techniques; approaches to structural and object design; models for databases (relational, hierarchical, networked and object-oriented designs) CASE tools, data dictionaries, repositories and warehouses, Windows/GUI coding and/or implementation, code and application generation, client-server planning, testing and installation, system conversion, end-user training and integration and post-implementation review. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
IT-135 or IT-145
IT-331: Human Factors in Information Technology
This course addresses the importance of the development of IT applications and systems. Students will be exposed to HCI fundamentals including user and task analysis, human factors, ergonomics, accessibility standards, and cognitive psychology. Emphasis will be placed on user-centered methodologies in the development, evaluation, and deployment of IT applications and systems.
IT-340: Network and Telecommunication Management
This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking theory, concepts and requirements relative to telecommunications and networking technologies, structures, hardware and software. Emphasis is on the concepts of communications theory and practices, terminology, and the analysis and design of networking applications. Management of telecommunications networks, cost-benefit analysis and evaluation of connectivity options are covered. Students can design, build and maintain a local area network (LAN). Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
CIS-201 or IT-201 and CIS-200 or IT-210
IT-380: Cybersecurity and Information Assurance
This course explores the basic concepts in cybersecurity and information assurance. Topics include security policies, models, and mechanisms for secrecy, integrity, and availability of communications and information. The course also covers approaches to prevent, detect and recover from the loss of information, cryptography and its applications, vulnerability scanning, functions of a chief security officer software applications and web services for maintaining information security and security in computer networks and distributed systems.
Prerequisites:
IT-330 and IT-340 or permission of instructor
IT-385: Information Technology Communications
The course focuses on the essential oral and written communication tools and strategies used when communicating in technology organizations, emphasizing on how to make information more usable and accessible to multiple audiences. Students will review how to develop includes functional specifications and proposals, training programs, technical illustrations, and web information architecture.
IT-412: Cyberlaw and Ethics
This course stresses the social and professional context of IT and computing related to ethical codes of conduct. Students will examine the historical, social, professional, ethical, and legal aspects of computing in the 21st century.
IT-415: Advanced Information Systems Design
This is the first of a two-part capstone course for IT majors which covers the major methodologies used in Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation. This course focuses mainly on the systems analysis part of the systems development process and emphasizes SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle). Different system development strategies are examined within the broader context of identifying and understanding the detailed stages the make up the systems analysis process. Students will learn how to a perform feasibility analysis, and to create a system proposal. Fact finding techniques used to determine system requirements will be identified and studied. Standard graphical modeling tools used in systems analysis will be covered: process modeling with data flow diagrams; data modeling with entity relationship diagrams; and object-oriented modeling using UML. The basic activities of project management are examined. Students will be assigned a systems development project case with concrete milestones, enabling the practical application of concepts presented in the course. This is a lab intensive course.
Prerequisites:
IT-201, IT-315, and IT-330 Senior prereg status
IT-420: Advanced Information Systems Implementation
This is the second part of the Capstone course for IT majors. The student groups will implement and document the systems project designed in IT 415 using an appropriate computer programming language or database management system. The instructor and students critique all projects weekly. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
CIS-415 or IT-415
IT-489: Information Technology Portfolio Planning
This course represents the integration of previous coursework and practical experience with a focus on authentic demonstration of competencies outlined by the program. Students will present a portfolio containing a collection of performance-based artifacts combined with metacognitive reflection and a professional statement of purpose that reflects their ability to make globally, socially, and ethically responsible information technology and systems decisions that are in line with legal and organizational policy requirements. The course will be structured around this critical task so that students have the appropriate support and resources required to be successful. The course culminates in a finished digital portfolio designed to be accessible via the Internet.

Free Elective Credits: 18

Total Credits: 120

Upon completion of the BA in Information Technologies, you’ll be able to:

  • Solve technology-related problems using effective and appropriate methods, tools and critical soft skills
  • Develop a professional identity from which to make globally, socially and ethically responsible information technology and systems decisions that are in line with legal and organizational policy requirements
  • Employ appropriate verbal and written communication skills to meet the needs of diverse audiences using oral, print and multimedia strategies
  • Recommend effective system design and maintenance solutions that meet user and organizational needs based on appropriate tools and applications for a given scenario
  • Recommend appropriate core information technologies, systems, data manipulation methods and computational thinking solutions to support organizational decision-making strategies within a business environment

BS in Information Technologies Online Courses

Required Core Courses

General Education Program

ECO-201: Microeconomics
This course examines the role of economic systems in allocating scarce resources to satisfy the needs and wants of individual members of a society. After a brief exposure to alternative economic systems, the focus becomes the nature and performance of American capitalism. Primary emphasis is placed upon the development of models that explain the behavior of consumers, producers and resource suppliers in various market structures.
Prerequisites:
MAT-130, 140, 210, 240 or MAT-106 & MAT-206
IT-100: Introduction to Information Technology
This is the fundamental computer fluency course required for all Southern New Hampshire University students. It is designed to promote a working knowledge and understanding of computer information technology concepts, skills and capabilities that support academic and professionally related goals and requirements. Students learn about the application and science of information technology. Concepts to master include the fundamentals of computer information technologies along with issues that affect people today such as : Internet and other network technologies, web publishing, digital media, hardware, software, file and database management, information security, viruses, and spyware, social impact, as well as algorithmic thinking and the limits of computation. Students develop capabilities such a managing complexity, assessing the quality of information, collaborating and communicating using IT, anticipating technological change and thinking abstractly and critically about IT. Students develop computer-related skills in support of their college studies and career goals. This is accomplished, in part, by the mastery of word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software.
MAT-240: Applied Statistics
This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

General Education Courses: 45 credits

Major Courses

Major Courses: 57 credits

IT-200: Fundamentals of Information Technology
This course offers a broad introduction to the tools and applications students will need to become successful professionals in the IT environment. Students will examine the core information technologies of human-computer interaction, information management, programming, networking, web systems and technologies, as well as information assurance and security.
IT-201: Computer Platform Technologies
This course provides the hardware/software technology background for information technology personnel. Hardware topics include CPU architecture, memory, registers, addressing modes, busses, instruction sets and a variety of input/output devices. Software topics include operating system modules, process management, memory and file system management. Also included are basic network components and multi-user operating systems. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
CIS-100 or IT-100
IT-210: Business Systems Analysis and Design
This course provides students with the necessary level of information technology education relative to understanding the uses and roles of information systems in business organizations. Students receive instruction on the information concepts and methodologies associated with the development of business information systems, and their effective application to the solution of business problems. Students learn the major issues of managing information technology in the contemporary business environment and the relationship between organizations' structures and information technology. Team approaches are utilized along with structured computer laboratories and cases using spreadsheet and database management tools. Writing intensive course.
IT-270: Web Site Design
This course serves as an introduction to creating interactive pages for the World Wide Web. Specifically, it will survey Internet concepts, network protocols and client-server communications. The course covers HTML, the language of the World Wide Web; the Document Object Model (DOM), essential to creating and manipulating elements of a Web page under program control; CSS, the syntax for building consistent styles and appearances across Web pages; and JavaScript, the programming language that cements the various technologies together to facilitate dynamic interactive elements. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
IT-135 or IT-145
IT-315: Object Oriented Analysis and Design
This course develops software systems engineering principles combining object-oriented design principles and methods augmented by computer assisted engineering (CASE) technology. The course involves use of the unified modeling language (UML) and, through the vehicle of a student group project, applies these elements to the system development life cycle. This course is writing intensive, as student project teams are required to submit a comprehensive project report and a PowerPoint presentation. Specialized Systems Development Computer Laboratory intensive and open laboratory intensive. Offered every year. Writing intensive course.
Prerequisites:
CIS-200 or IT-210
IT-328: Project Management in Information Technology
This course the projects management strategies specific to IT projects, cost/benefit analysis, responsibilities of key stakeholders, project planning, and tracking tools.
IT-330: Database Design and Management
This course covers the design and implementation of information systems within a database management system environment. Students will demonstrate their mastery of the design process acquired in earlier courses by designing and constructing a physical system using database software to implement logical design. Topics include data models and modeling tools and techniques; approaches to structural and object design; models for databases (relational, hierarchical, networked and object-oriented designs) CASE tools, data dictionaries, repositories and warehouses, Windows/GUI coding and/or implementation, code and application generation, client-server planning, testing and installation, system conversion, end-user training and integration and post-implementation review. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
IT-135 or IT-145
IT-331: Human Factors in Information Technology
This course addresses the importance of the development of IT applications and systems. Students will be exposed to HCI fundamentals including user and task analysis, human factors, ergonomics, accessibility standards, and cognitive psychology. Emphasis will be placed on user-centered methodologies in the development, evaluation, and deployment of IT applications and systems.
IT-340: Network and Telecommunication Management
This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking theory, concepts and requirements relative to telecommunications and networking technologies, structures, hardware and software. Emphasis is on the concepts of communications theory and practices, terminology, and the analysis and design of networking applications. Management of telecommunications networks, cost-benefit analysis and evaluation of connectivity options are covered. Students can design, build and maintain a local area network (LAN). Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
CIS-201 or IT-201 and CIS-200 or IT-210
IT-380: Cybersecurity and Information Assurance
This course explores the basic concepts in cybersecurity and information assurance. Topics include security policies, models, and mechanisms for secrecy, integrity, and availability of communications and information. The course also covers approaches to prevent, detect and recover from the loss of information, cryptography and its applications, vulnerability scanning, functions of a chief security officer software applications and web services for maintaining information security and security in computer networks and distributed systems.
Prerequisites:
IT-330 and IT-340 or permission of instructor
IT-385: Information Technology Communications
The course focuses on the essential oral and written communication tools and strategies used when communicating in technology organizations, emphasizing on how to make information more usable and accessible to multiple audiences. Students will review how to develop includes functional specifications and proposals, training programs, technical illustrations, and web information architecture.
IT-412: Cyberlaw and Ethics
This course stresses the social and professional context of IT and computing related to ethical codes of conduct. Students will examine the historical, social, professional, ethical, and legal aspects of computing in the 21st century.
IT-415: Advanced Information Systems Design
This is the first of a two-part capstone course for IT majors which covers the major methodologies used in Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation. This course focuses mainly on the systems analysis part of the systems development process and emphasizes SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle). Different system development strategies are examined within the broader context of identifying and understanding the detailed stages the make up the systems analysis process. Students will learn how to a perform feasibility analysis, and to create a system proposal. Fact finding techniques used to determine system requirements will be identified and studied. Standard graphical modeling tools used in systems analysis will be covered: process modeling with data flow diagrams; data modeling with entity relationship diagrams; and object-oriented modeling using UML. The basic activities of project management are examined. Students will be assigned a systems development project case with concrete milestones, enabling the practical application of concepts presented in the course. This is a lab intensive course.
Prerequisites:
IT-201, IT-315, and IT-330 Senior prereg status
IT-420: Advanced Information Systems Implementation
This is the second part of the Capstone course for IT majors. The student groups will implement and document the systems project designed in IT 415 using an appropriate computer programming language or database management system. The instructor and students critique all projects weekly. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
CIS-415 or IT-415
IT-489: Information Technology Portfolio Planning
This course represents the integration of previous coursework and practical experience with a focus on authentic demonstration of competencies outlined by the program. Students will present a portfolio containing a collection of performance-based artifacts combined with metacognitive reflection and a professional statement of purpose that reflects their ability to make globally, socially, and ethically responsible information technology and systems decisions that are in line with legal and organizational policy requirements. The course will be structured around this critical task so that students have the appropriate support and resources required to be successful. The course culminates in a finished digital portfolio designed to be accessible via the Internet.

Free Elective Credits: 6

Total Credits: 120

Upon completion of the BS in information technologies, you’ll be able to:

  • Solve technology-related problems using effective and appropriate methods, tools and critical soft-skills
  • Develop a professional identity from which to make globally, socially and ethically responsible information technology and systems decisions that are in line with legal and organizational policy requirements
  • Employ appropriate verbal and written communication skills to meet the needs of a variety of stakeholders and decision-makers using oral, print and multimedia strategies
  • Recommend effective system design and maintenance solutions that meet user and organizational needs based on appropriate tools and applications for a given scenario
  • Recommend appropriate core information technologies, systems, data manipulation methods, and computational thinking solutions to support organizational decision-making strategies within a business environment
  • Employ managerial strategies and interpersonal skills to promote success in a high-functioning organization
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