Online Game Design and Development
Degree - Curriculum

A Hands-On Game Designing Program

When reviewing an online Game Design and Development degree curriculum, consider the specific skills you will develop, how interactive your classes will be and the hands-on experience you will get with relevant software.

Our Game Design and Development curriculum is based on recommendations by the International Game Developers Association to align with industry standards. Courses prepare you for a career in a real video game-production environment. Classes are taught by skilled professionals who understand how to bridge the gap between what you will learn and how it can be applied in the real world.

Students interested in this program should review Game Design and Development technical requirements and student discounts on software and computers.

Required Core Courses

School of Arts and Sciences Required Courses (BA Only)

COM-212: Public Speaking
This course is designed to help students develop abilities, including organization and delivery skills, for all speaking situations. The evaluation and improvement of voice, diction, articulation and posture also are studied. May not be used as literature elective.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120, ENG-121H ENG-200 or ENG-200H
PSY-108: Introduction to Psychology
This course provides students an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Students prepare for more advanced concepts in upper-level Psychology courses by learning the basics of how to evaluate research and exploring various areas of specialization within the discipline. Offered every semester.

Select One of the Following:

BIO-210: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
Discussion/comparison of the principles of mammalian form and function. Includes molecular and cellular mechanisms of major processes (such as muscle contraction, neural transmission, and signal transduction) and examines the structure and function of the 11 organ systems of the human body. Laboratory exercises (BIO-210L) to follow lecture topics.
MAT-350: Applied Linear Algebra
This is a first course in linear algebra and matrices. Topics include systems of linear equations, linear independence, matrices of linear transformations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. After mastering the basic concepts and skills, students will use their knowledge of linear algebra to model a selection of applied mathematics problems in business, science, computer science and economics.
Prerequisites:
MAT-210 with a grade of C or better

Game Design and Development (BA) Online Major Courses

GAM-135: Interactive 3-D Virtual Environments
This course introduces students to the underlying concepts in manipulating a three dimensional virtual reality environment. The objects in this environment are both recognizable (dinosaur, tree, airplane) and also proper objects as the term is used in computer science. Students will work individually and in teams animating to specific objectives with a significant deliverable at the end of the course. Implementations of interactive advertising or educational games are potential project areas. Topics include: virtual reality concepts (objects, point of view, lighting), object oriented concepts (properties, methods, events), and animation control concepts (collision detection, decision implementation, iteration, and parallel activities). This course is cross listed with IT 135.
GAM-207: Information Technology and Digital Games
Introduction to digital games and information technology covers game genres and platforms, interface design, game implementation, artificial intelligence, business economics of the game industry, game marketing and design, e-collaboration, and e-commerce. Students learn how to use software packages to design and implement digital games and how to use the Internet to market and distribute digital games. The course includes a project which will culminate in the conception, design, and prototype of an original digital game. The course is designed for students who have an interest in IT and games, including original game concepts, design and implementation, and executive leadership in the game industry. Knowledge of computer programming is not required.
GAM-303: Design of Virtual Game Environments
This core topic addresses the fundamental ideas behind the design of electronic games as virtual environments. It touches on relevant formal fields such as systems theory, cybernetics, and game theory. Included are basics of interactive design, including interface design, information design and human-computer interaction. Emphasis is placed on how virtual game environments function to create experiences, including rule design, play mechanics, game balancing, social game interaction and the integration of visual, audio, tactile and textual elements into the total virtual game environment experience. Game documentation and play-testing are also covered.
Prerequisites:
IT-207 or GAM-207
GAM-305: Digital Game Development
To provide a technically well-founded introduction to game development using programming languages and various gaming editors. On completing this course, the student will have acquired a fundamental understanding of the Windows API, the use of sprites, animation and audio in an integrated game environment. This course is cross-listed with IT 305.
Prerequisites:
IT-207
GAM-430: 3-D Modeling and Animation
In this course students are introduced to a multitude of techniques in 3-D graphics and animation as they master the many tools of 3-D Studio Max. This hands-on computer course includes modifying primitives (simple, predefined geometry) and modeling new geometry with splines and mesh editing. Topics include creating and applying textures with ray tracing (reflections) and bump maps to 3-D geometry. In addition, students learn how to animate geometry and textures. Virtual lights and cameras will be created by students to increase the realism and style of the created models. Students will learn how to add 3-D animations and images to web pages, videos, and printed documents; students will also learn how to create virtual objects and figures for use in 3-D games.
Prerequisites:
COM-230
GAM-450: Artificial Intelligence
This course explores contemporary tools and principles of artificial intelligence that focus on Web commerce applications and business intelligence in particular. Topics include mining data for business intelligence and collaborative software agents that utilize resources on the Web to carry out tasks for individuals and organizations. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
GAM-211
GAM-465: Digital Multimedia Development
This course presents digital multimedia theory and develops skills that meet the design and technical requirements of professionally created multimedia for World Wide Web commercial applications on a variety of platforms and Internet applications. Each student develops a professional portfolio consisting of CD-ROM material. Students also develop working Web sites that display their multimedia projects. Topics include sound, animation, video, interactivity and multimedia distribution. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
IT-375 or GRA-310
GRA-202: 3-D Modeling and Animation
In this course students will be introduced to 3DS max. It will give them an overview of what max does specifically for games. This course will be focused on modeling. Students will learn the basics of modeling low poly and high poly models. How they are unwrapped and used in conjunction with textures. It will also show a wide range of techniques used in the industry for modeling for mobile, PC and current generation consoles.
Prerequisites:
COM-230 and GRA-220

Courses GRA-202 and IT-430 are interchangeable; students need to only select one of the two.
Students may select a concentration area from the options below (Game Production and the Business of Gaming is only available for BS students).

Free Elective Credits: 33

Game Design and Development (BS) Online Major Courses

GAM-135: Interactive 3-D Virtual Environments
This course introduces students to the underlying concepts in manipulating a three dimensional virtual reality environment. The objects in this environment are both recognizable (dinosaur, tree, airplane) and also proper objects as the term is used in computer science. Students will work individually and in teams animating to specific objectives with a significant deliverable at the end of the course. Implementations of interactive advertising or educational games are potential project areas. Topics include: virtual reality concepts (objects, point of view, lighting), object oriented concepts (properties, methods, events), and animation control concepts (collision detection, decision implementation, iteration, and parallel activities). This course is cross listed with IT 135.
GAM-207: Information Technology and Digital Games
Introduction to digital games and information technology covers game genres and platforms, interface design, game implementation, artificial intelligence, business economics of the game industry, game marketing and design, e-collaboration, and e-commerce. Students learn how to use software packages to design and implement digital games and how to use the Internet to market and distribute digital games. The course includes a project which will culminate in the conception, design, and prototype of an original digital game. The course is designed for students who have an interest in IT and games, including original game concepts, design and implementation, and executive leadership in the game industry. Knowledge of computer programming is not required.
GAM-303: Design of Virtual Game Environments
This core topic addresses the fundamental ideas behind the design of electronic games as virtual environments. It touches on relevant formal fields such as systems theory, cybernetics, and game theory. Included are basics of interactive design, including interface design, information design and human-computer interaction. Emphasis is placed on how virtual game environments function to create experiences, including rule design, play mechanics, game balancing, social game interaction and the integration of visual, audio, tactile and textual elements into the total virtual game environment experience. Game documentation and play-testing are also covered.
Prerequisites:
IT-207 or GAM-207
GAM-305: Digital Game Development
To provide a technically well-founded introduction to game development using programming languages and various gaming editors. On completing this course, the student will have acquired a fundamental understanding of the Windows API, the use of sprites, animation and audio in an integrated game environment. This course is cross-listed with IT 305.
Prerequisites:
IT-207
GAM-430: 3-D Modeling and Animation
In this course students are introduced to a multitude of techniques in 3-D graphics and animation as they master the many tools of 3-D Studio Max. This hands-on computer course includes modifying primitives (simple, predefined geometry) and modeling new geometry with splines and mesh editing. Topics include creating and applying textures with ray tracing (reflections) and bump maps to 3-D geometry. In addition, students learn how to animate geometry and textures. Virtual lights and cameras will be created by students to increase the realism and style of the created models. Students will learn how to add 3-D animations and images to web pages, videos, and printed documents; students will also learn how to create virtual objects and figures for use in 3-D games.
Prerequisites:
COM-230
GAM-450: Artificial Intelligence
This course explores contemporary tools and principles of artificial intelligence that focus on Web commerce applications and business intelligence in particular. Topics include mining data for business intelligence and collaborative software agents that utilize resources on the Web to carry out tasks for individuals and organizations. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
GAM-211
GAM-465: Digital Multimedia Development
This course presents digital multimedia theory and develops skills that meet the design and technical requirements of professionally created multimedia for World Wide Web commercial applications on a variety of platforms and Internet applications. Each student develops a professional portfolio consisting of CD-ROM material. Students also develop working Web sites that display their multimedia projects. Topics include sound, animation, video, interactivity and multimedia distribution. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
IT-375 or GRA-310
IT-135: Interactive 3-D Virtual Environments
This course introduces students to the underlying concepts in manipulating a three dimensional virtual reality environment. The objects in this environment are both recognizable (dinosaur, tree, airplane) and also proper objects as the term is used in computer science. Students will work individually and in teams animating to specific objectives with a significant deliverable at the end of the course. Implementations of interactive advertising or educational games are potential project areas. Topics include: virtual reality concepts (objects, point of view, lighting), object oriented concepts (properties, methods, events), and animation control concepts (collision detection, decision implementation, iteration, and parallel activities).
Prerequisites:
IT-100
IT-207: Information Technology and Digital Games
Introduction to digital games and information technology covers game genres and platforms, interface design, game implementation, artificial intelligence, business economics of the game industry, game marketing and design, e-collaboration, and e-commerce. Students learn how to use software packages to design and implement digital games and how to use the Internet to market and distribute digital games. The course includes a project which will culminate in the conception, design, and prototype of an original digital game. The course is designed for students who have an interest in IT and games, including original game concepts, design and implementation, and executive leadership in the game industry. Knowledge of computer programming is not required.
Prerequisites:
IT-100
IT-303: Design of Virtual Game Environments
This core topic addresses the fundamental ideas behind the design of electronic games as virtual environments. It touches on relevant formal fields such as systems theory, cybernetics, and game theory. Included are basics of interactive design, including interface design, information design and human-computer interaction. Emphasis is placed on how virtual game environments function to create experiences, including rule design, play mechanics, game balancing, social game interaction and the integration of visual, audio, tactile and textual elements into the total virtual game environment experience. Game documentation and play-testing are also covered.
Prerequisites:
IT-207 or GAM-207
IT-305: Digital Game Development
To provide a technically well-founded introduction to game development using programming languages and various gaming editors. On completing this course, the student will have acquired a fundamental understanding of the Windows API, the use of sprites, animation and audio in an integrated game environment.
Prerequisites:
IT-207 or GAM-207 or permission of instructor
IT-430: 3-D Modeling and Animation
In this course students are introduced to a multitude of techniques in 3D graphics and animation as they master the many tools of 3D Studio Max. This hands-on computer course includes modifying primitives (simple, predefined geometry) and modeling new geometry with splines and mesh editing. Topics include creating and applying textures with ray tracing (reflections) and bump maps to 3D geometry. In addition, students learn how to animate geometry and textures. Virtual lights and cameras will be created by students to increase the realism and style of the created models. Students will learn how to add 3D animations and images to web pages, videos and printed documents. Students will also learn how to create virtual objects and figures for use in 3D games.
IT-450: Artificial Intelligence
This course explores contemporary tools and principles of artificial intelligence that focus on Web commerce applications and business intelligence in particular. Topics include mining data for business intelligence and collaborative software agents that utilize resources on the Web to carry out tasks for individuals and organizations. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
IT-135 or IT-145
IT-465: Digital Multimedia Development
This course presents digital multimedia theory and develops skills that meet the design and technical requirements of professionally created multimedia for World Wide Web commercial applications on a variety of platforms and Internet applications. Each student develops a professional portfolio consisting of CD-ROM material. Students also develop working Web sites that display their multimedia projects. Topics include sound, animation, video, interactivity and multimedia distribution. Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
IT-375 or GRA-310

Students may choose between coinciding GAM and IT courses (i.e. GAM-135 or IT-135).
Students may select one of the concentration areas below.

Free Elective Credits: 18

Visual and Interactive Storytelling Online Degree (BA/BS)

Select Four of the Following:

COM-327: Screenwriting for Media Arts
This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of screenwriting for short narrative and commercial projects. Students will analyze screenplays and scripts, and then learn basic screenwriting concepts and tools. Students will be attending lectures and film screenings, completing in-class writing exercises and proposals, providing valuable critique to their colleagues, and completing at least one treatment, pitch and screenplay.
Prerequisites:
ENG-121 or ENG-200
ENG-327: Play Writing Workshop
This course is a roundtable forum in which 10 to 15 students will write stage plays of various lengths using traditional and experimental methods and forms. Members of the class will produce at intervals to be established by the instructor and will take turns presenting their works to the group for comment and discussion. The class will produce some student plays during the term. May not be used as a literature elective. Not available every semester. Writing Intensive Course.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
ENG-329: Fiction Writing Workshop
This course is a roundtable forum in which 10 to 15 students will write short or long fiction using the techniques of 19th-century realism as well as modernist and experimental techniques. Members of the class will produce on a weekly basis and take turns presenting their manuscripts to the group for commentary and discussion. May not be used as a literature elective. Not available every semester.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-120H
LIT-229: World Mythology
This course introduces students to the study of mythology. We will read and discuss myths from both western and non-western cultures. Students will also choose one cultures myth to concentrate on for a final project.
Prerequisites:
ENG-10, ENG-120, ENG-121H or ENG-200
LIT-322: Popular and Contemporary Fiction
This course will analyze today's popular and contemporary fiction. What makes a book a "best seller"? What makes literature sell in the millions of copies? Writers who strike it rich generally write books that are fast paced and easy to read, following a set of conventions that readers recognize, and touch a nerve within their society. Writers who win the hearts of the literati and schoolmarms generally try to touch that nerve also, but they do so with language and plots that are inventive, artistic, and memorable. With a focus on current and past best sellers, this course will introduce you to a variety of literary sub-genres (true crime, memoir, road novel, extreme adventure, western, roots quest). The books we will read often return to themes of individualism, race, and violence in American culture- prominent elements in our psyches, popular culture, and pulp fiction- though we will certainly discuss other themes as well.
Prerequisites:
ENG-120 or ENG-121H

Game Development and Supporting Technologies (BA/BS)

Select Four of the Following:

IT-201: Computer Platform Technologies
This course provides the hardware/software technology background for information technology personnel. Hardware topics include CPU architecture, memory, registers, addressing modes, busses, instruction sets and a variety of input/output devices. Software topics include operating system modules, process management, memory and file system management. Also included are basic network components and multi-user operating systems. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
CIS-100 or IT-100
IT-230: Software Development with C#.NET
This course is designed to introduce C#, an event-driven, fully object-oriented, visual programming language. The course covers the Visual Studio.NET integrated development environment (IDE) while covering the basics of the C# language. Topics include input / output statements, arithmetic and logical operations, control structures, program modules (methods and classes) and arrays. Students will be involved in writing programs of increasing complexity throughout the course, offered every year. This is a programming course.
IT-232: Software Development w/C++.NET
This course teaches students how to design, implement and test applications in the C++ programming language. Topics include C++ data types, operators, functions, classes and inheritance. The course introduces students to issues associated with developing real-world applications by presenting several case studies. The concepts of object-oriented design and programming are covered. Offered as needed. This is a programming course.
Prerequisites:
IT-135 or IT-145
IT-315: Object Oriented Analysis and Design
This course develops software systems engineering principles combining object-oriented design principles and methods augmented by computer assisted engineering (CASE) technology. The course involves use of the unified modeling language (UML) and, through the vehicle of a student group project, applies these elements to the system development life cycle. This course is writing intensive, as student project teams are required to submit a comprehensive project report and a PowerPoint presentation. Specialized Systems Development Computer Laboratory intensive and open laboratory intensive. Offered every year. Writing intensive course.
Prerequisites:
CIS-200 or IT-210
IT-330: Database Design and Management
This course covers the design and implementation of information systems within a database management system environment. Students will demonstrate their mastery of the design process acquired in earlier courses by designing and constructing a physical system using database software to implement logical design. Topics include data models and modeling tools and techniques; approaches to structural and object design; models for databases (relational, hierarchical, networked and object-oriented designs) CASE tools, data dictionaries, repositories and warehouses, Windows/GUI coding and/or implementation, code and application generation, client-server planning, testing and installation, system conversion, end-user training and integration and post-implementation review. Offered every year.
Prerequisites:
IT-135 or IT-145
IT-340: Network and Telecommunication Management
This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking theory, concepts and requirements relative to telecommunications and networking technologies, structures, hardware and software. Emphasis is on the concepts of communications theory and practices, terminology, and the analysis and design of networking applications. Management of telecommunications networks, cost-benefit analysis and evaluation of connectivity options are covered. Students can design, build and maintain a local area network (LAN). Offered as needed.
Prerequisites:
CIS-201 or IT-201 and CIS-200 or IT-210

Total Credits: 120

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Admission

Phone: 888.327.SNHU
Email: enroll@snhu.edu